Law Office of Todd K. Bolus, PLLC
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How to Communicate During Your Family Law Dispute

In family law matters, as relationships collapse, this office all too frequently finds itself undoing damage done by litigants who inadvertently make bad decisions in how they communicate at each step of the process. These decisions tend to be born in a cauldron of vindictiveness, pride or stubbornness, and always lead to negative results. Under Kentucky law, it is very difficult to obtain a mulligan (or "redo", for all non-golfers), so it is very important to attempt good decisionmaking and effective communications from the start.

The most common bad decisions or rash comments are predictable, as are the results. They are:

- Spiteful comments about or to the other parent made in the presence of the children.

- Spiteful comments about or to the other parent made via text, email, on Facebook, twitter or other social media.

- Turning a blind eye while family members, friends, or new significant others disparage the other party to their face or in front of the children.

These are merely a few ways that a divorce or family law litigant can negatively impact their case through conduct.  Those negative impacts can lead to everything from a scolding from the court to restrictions on parenting time.

While there are no guarantees as to result, in Louisville, the successful litigant guards against these problems as they arise.

Whenever communicating with or about a former spouse or co-parent, ask yourself the following:

1. Is it necessary?

2. Is it appropriate?

3. Will it accomplish a positive goal?

4. How you would react if you received such a communication?

5. Is it overly complex?

6. Is it too reactive?

7. Are you scolding or berating the former spouse or co-parent?

By considering these factors, we make the process smoother and cut down on conflict, thereby reducing the number of stressful interactions.  The end result is better for any involved children and definitely for the litigants.

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